Prentice, Kónya & Prentice: Was the African American Great Migration Delayed by Outlawing Emigrant Agents?

Posted on: April 12th, 2018 by EBHS No Comments

Editors of the Essays in Economic and Business History announce the publication of Khayen Prentice, László Kónya, and David Prentice’s In Press article:

Was the African American Great Migration Delayed by Outlawing Emigrant Agents?

The question of why the Great Migration from the South did not begin before the 1910s remains open. The empirical significance of laws outlawing emigrant agents, who could have helped African Americans migrate, has not previously been considered. We analyze two natural experiments whereby one state had a law but its neighbor did not. We fail to find any significant effects of the laws. These results are consistent with demand and supply factors highlighted in the earlier literature delaying the Great Migration.

Giedeman & Compton: Steam Engines of Credit: The Role of Banks in Switzerland’s Economic Development, 1850-1913

Posted on: March 16th, 2018 by EBHS No Comments

Editors of the Essays in Economic and Business History announce the publication of Daniel C. Giedeman and Ryan A. Compton’s In Press article forthcoming in the May 2018 printed volume of the journal.

Steam Engines of Credit: The Role of Banks in Switzerland’s Economic Development, 1850-1913

From the mid-nineteenth century to the beginning of World War One, the Swiss economy grew to be among the most advanced in the world. Economists however have not yet completely determined the reasons for Switzerland’s economic success. One source of this success may have been the Swiss banking system. This article explores the link between Swiss banks and Swiss economic development using historical analysis and time series econometric techniques. The evidence suggests that Switzerland’s banks contributed to Swiss economic success and that Switzerland’s universal banks in particular contributed to the country’s industrial development.

Haggerty & Haggerty: Avoiding “Musty Mutton Chops”: The Network Narrative of an American Merchant in London, 1771-1774

Posted on: March 15th, 2018 by EBHS No Comments

Editors of the Essays in Economic and Business History announce the publication of John and Sheryllynne Haggerty’s In Press article forthcoming in the May 2018 printed volume of the journal.

Avoiding “Musty Mutton Chops”: The Network Narrative of an American Merchant in London, 1771-1774

Historians have increasingly been using network and narrative analysis as a means by which to explore their data. By doing so, they are able to explore how actors of interest used their relationships to undertake business and economic endeavors, and how, in turn, these were shaped by the discourse to which they had access. This paper presents a novel methodology using visual analytics to combine both social network (relationship) and textual (sentiment) analysis to visualize the information contained in historical sources over time. The definition of network narrative posited in this paper allows the historian to quantify and therefore assess the impact of, and reaction to, endogenous and exogenous events on actor networks. In order demonstrate the applicability of this approach, we apply it to the case study of Joshua Johnson, an American merchant in London during the 1772 credit crisis. This paper builds on the more recent network studies which show that networks were not only complex, but changed over time in reaction to events.