Essays in Economic & Business History, Vol 36, No 1 (2018)

Posted on: June 27th, 2018 by EBHS No Comments

Essays in Economic and Business History

Essays in Economic & Business History, Vol 36, No 1 (2018), is now published online and can be found here.

This issue includes following articles:

The Newest on the New Deal PDF
Price Fishback
The Co-movement of the Irish, UK, and US Stock Markets, 1869–1925 PDF
Rebecca Stuart
Unwritten Rules and Gendered Frames Amongst Probate Appraisers? Evidence from Eighteenth-Century York County, Virginia PDF
Wendy Lucas, Noel Campbell
Global Trade and Development: The Good, Bad, and Unanticipated 1600-1800 PDF
Ann Carlos
Steam Engines of Credit: The Role of Banks in Switzerland’s Economic Development, 1850-1913 PDF
Daniel C. Giedeman, Ryan A. Compton
The Growth of the Japanese Electric Power Industry and the World Bank’s Request to Increase Depreciation Costs Between 1951 and 1973 PDF
Takashi Kitaura
Philosopher’s Concrete: Dam Construction, Farmland Values, and Agricultural Production in the Western US, 1890–1920 PDF
Soudeh Mirghasemi
Colonial Transatlantiques: The French Line in Algeria, 1880-1940PDF
John H. Perry
Early American Joint-Stock Investors and Their Challenges Investing in a Physical Structure: The Case of Boston’s Long Wharf, 1710-1825 PDF
Kelly M. Kilcrease
The Entrepreneurial Culture and the Mysteries of Economic Development PDF
Louis Galambos

Deirdre Nansen McCloskey, The 43rd EBHS Conference Keynote Lecture, May 30, 2018, University of Jyväskylä, Finland

Posted on: June 7th, 2018 by EBHS No Comments

Prentice, Kónya & Prentice: Was the African American Great Migration Delayed by Outlawing Emigrant Agents?

Posted on: April 12th, 2018 by EBHS No Comments

Editors of the Essays in Economic and Business History announce the publication of Khayen Prentice, László Kónya, and David Prentice’s In Press article:

Was the African American Great Migration Delayed by Outlawing Emigrant Agents?

The question of why the Great Migration from the South did not begin before the 1910s remains open. The empirical significance of laws outlawing emigrant agents, who could have helped African Americans migrate, has not previously been considered. We analyze two natural experiments whereby one state had a law but its neighbor did not. We fail to find any significant effects of the laws. These results are consistent with demand and supply factors highlighted in the earlier literature delaying the Great Migration.